What Did We Learn from the Eclipse?

Posted by Glynn Below - 23 August, 2017

eclipse-LS.jpgIt sure was great for school to be in session as Randolph kids enjoyed the high-energy Great American Eclipse on Monday, August 21.

The excitement was everywhere as Head of School Jay Rainey, approved viewing glasses in hand, bounded out of the Administration Building, declaring, "It's happening!"

Eclipse-cereal.jpgThe Lower School classes made several trips to the field, masterfully using the eclipse-viewing masks, especially made for our littlest astronomers so that the glasses stayed put. "This is the greatest day ever!" shouted one 1st grader.

One Kindergartner whispered, "I can't see anything!" Her hands were over the lenses! Staff and faculty were on hand to assure safety instructions were followed.

The 4th graders used handmade cereal box viewers and loved experiencing the shadows with classmates.

Middle Schoolers feasted on Moon Pies and Capri Suns as they dispersed around campus to watch the 97% eclipse.

Senior Esper Chao '18 reported from the Garth Campus:

"I noticed that while before the eclipse there were many clouds covering the sun, after the eclipse the skies were cloudless. Being a sort of meteorology geek, I was amazed that the weather was actually affected by the eclipse: the lack of sunlight made the air cooler and more stable, reducing the instability that is needed to form clouds.

Eclipse_4532.jpg"Part of the fun was sharing my excitement with other students/teachers, and vice versa. Discussing the visible effects of the eclipse (shadows, wildlife), and seeing their shared interest/fascination, was very gratifying for me.

"What I loved most about the experience was how different people of varying interests, from science people to arts people to sports people, all came together to express a shared anticipation and excitement over a common event."

You can read more about how we prepared for the day of the eclipse here.

Topics: science, eclipse, meteorology


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